Aigleville Alabama

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Parisian engraving from 1819 of the building of the Aigleville settlement, directed by General Lefèbvre-Desnoëttes. Note the erroneous inclusion of palm trees, which are not found in central Alabama.

Parisian engraving from 1819 of the building of the Aigleville settlement, directed by General Lefèbvre-Desnoëttes. Note the erroneous inclusion of palm trees, which are not found in central Alabama.

Aigleville, Alabama, literally translated as Eagle Town, was a town on the Black Warrior River in Marengo County, Alabama. The settlement was established in late 1818 by former French Bonapartists and refugees from Saint-Domingue, as a part of their Vine and Olive Colony.

Each settler at Aigleville owned three separate land lots. These included the town lot, a garden lot (called a small allotment), and a farm (called a large allotment).

Aigleville Location within the state of Alabama

Aigleville Location within the state of Alabama

With the failure of the colony at large, Aigleville was a largely abandoned by the late 1830s. Despite this, General Lefèbvre-Desnoëttes‘ house was noted as still standing during a governmental resurvey of the area in 1842. The site was heavily forested by the early 20th century. This gave way to open land with industrial usage during the later half of the 20th and into the 21st century, under its ownership by a local cement plant.

Alabama Cities Index

Alabama Ghost Towns Index

Wikipedia contributors, “Aigleville (Alabama),”  Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Aigleville_(Alabama)&oldid=636968409 (accessed January 16, 2015).

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