Category: Forts of Alabama

Current and historic military related sites of Alabama including the War of 1812, American Revolution, Civil War, Seminole Wars, Creek Wars and assorted skirmishes. 

Explore Alabama: Forts of Alabama is our currated and researched list of present and former forts in Alabama. Not all forts were for use of the military in Alabama. Many were constructed by civilians for their use in case of Indian attacks. 

Hundreds of forts are listed in our list within this category but not all have been thoroughly researched as well as we would like. The research continues on a daily basis. If you would like to know when we have updated information, you may want to subscribe to the RSS feed for this category or subscribe to the newsletter.

Thanks,

Terry W. Platt, Editor

Terry W. Platt, webmaster

Twelfth of twelve photographs documenting the bombardment of Fort Morgan, Alabama, by Union troops in August 1864.

Fort Morgan Alabama

Explore Alabama Ghosts and Haunted Places – Fort Morgan, in Baldwin County, Alabama, was built in 1819 was in use during the Civil War, Spanish American War, World War I and World War II.
It is rumored that visitors can hear the cries and screams of men late into the night, and they have seen the ghost of a solitary woman searching for justice after being killed at the fort.

Continue reading

Blakeley Alabama

Overlooking the marshes of the Mobile-Tensaw Delta just north of Mobile is the site
of the Alabama ghost town of Blakeley.

Now a part of Historic Blakeley State Park, the city once competed with Mobile for the status of queen city of Lower Alabama. All that remains today are gravestones, a few ruins and traces of old streets.

Continue reading
Free Things To Do In Alabama Fort Conde Mobile AL

Fort Conde

Mobile was originally founded by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville in 1702 as Fort Louis de la Mobile at 27-Mile Bluff up river (27 miles [43 km] from the mouth).[1][2] After the Mobile River flooded and damaged the fort, Mobile was relocated in 1711 to the current site. A temporary wooden stockade fort was constructed, also named Fort Louis after the old fort up river.[1] In 1723, construction of a new brick fort with a stone foundation began, renamed later as Fort Condé in honor of Louis Henri de Bourbon, duc de Bourbon and prince de Condé.

Continue reading

The Miracle of Mobile Bay

This story is not fiction. It is an amazing account of an episode in connection with the naval battle in Mobile bay, on August 5 1864, when the monitor Tecumseh was sunk in action. The names in the story, as told by Rear Admiral Goodrich, are real, and with the historic facts set forth are in the records of the great Civil war.

Continue reading
error: .