Affair At Madison Station

Affair At Madison Station

Affair At Madison Station
May 17, 1864
The largest engagement of the Civil War in Madison County Alabama was fought during a driving rainstorm in Madison, Alabama at the site of the railroad depot. Under the command of Col. Josiah Patterson, the Confederate forces (~1000 cavalry and a battery of artillery) crossed the Tennessee River near Triana and attacked a garrison of ~350 men of the 13th Illinois Infantry. Union forces fell back along the railroad toward Huntsville to Indian Creek. They counterattacked after being reinforced by infantry from Huntsville.

Battle of Selma Re-enactment

Battle of Selma

Wilson’s Raid in Alabama and Georgia (1865), was a military engagement near the end of the American Civil War. It was fought in Selma, Alabama, on April 2, 1865, a town of about ten thousand inhabitants.

Rebel Line of Works at Blakely

Rebel line of works at Blakely captured by the Army of West Miss., April 9, 1865. Union positions are colored blue, and Confederate works are red. Includes roads, vegetation, drainage, and relief by hachures.

Map of the Alabama and Tennessee River Railroad between Blue Mountain Station and Jacksonville, Calhoun County Alabama

Blue Mountain Alabama

The Blue Mountain area was settled by the Hudgins family in the late thirties and for years was the terminus of the Selma, Rome and Dalton Railroad, being the shipping station for the Oxford furnace. During the War, the Confederate Government operated both the railroad and the furnace, the iron being shipped to Selma to make “Ironclads” for the Confederacy. The town was burned in 1864.

Confederate Civil War Field Hospital

Civil War Confederate Hospitals In Alabama

The Civil War was fought in over 10,000 places and was the bloodiest war in the history of the United States. Two percent of the population at the time (approximately 620,000) died during the conflict. More Americans died in the Civil War than in all other wars combined.

Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor Surrenders In Citronelle Alabama

Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor Surrenders In Citronelle Alabama
May 4, 1865
Citronelle, Alabama

At the wars end Confederate Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor held command of the administrative entity called the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, with some 12,000 troops. Mobile, Alabama had fallen to Union forces in April of 1865 and Taylor had received news of General Johnston’s surrender to Union General Sherman. Taylor agreed to meet Union Major General E.R.S. Canby for a conference a few miles north of Mobile at Magee Farm, in the town of Kushla, on April 30th at which time they established a truce, terminable after 48 hours notice by either party. The Confederate general arrived at Magee Farm on a handcar propelled by two African Americans. A single officer, Colonel William Levy, accompanied them. General Canby, on the other hand, reached the meeting place accompanied by his staff in dress uniforms, a full brigade of Union troops and a military band. The two generals met 20 miles further north at Citronelle in Mobile County on May 4, 1865.

Fort Gaines, Alabama

Fort Gaines

Fort Gaines is an historic fort on Dauphin Island, Alabama. It is best known for its role in the Battle of Mobile Bay during the American Civil War.

The War In North Alabama. Rout Of A Rebel Force, Under General Ledbetter, Near Bridgeport. Sketched by Mr. H. Hubner

Bridgeport Alabama

Bridgeport Alabama was the site of a major skirmish on April 29 and August 26, 1862, and numerous other small actions took place in the area. In the latter part of the war, Bridgeport was the site of a major shipyard building gunboats and transports for the Union Army.

Battle of Day's Gap Civil War Battlefield

Battle of Day’s Gap

The Battle of Day’s Gap, fought on April 30, 1863, was the first in a series of American Civil War skirmishes in Cullman County, Alabama, that lasted until a battle on May 2nd, known as Streight’s Raid.